KUBRA BINICI


Datto - Ticket Panel


During my internship of the summer of 2016, I worked at a company called Datto, which specializes in information backup and recovery. Over the course of that summer, I worked on the Admin Portal, which is an internal portal used mainly by the Datto employees in sales and tech support. My first task was to redesign a few of the panels that conveyed information for sales reps to use when working with a certain client.


The first panel I worked on was called the Ticket Panel. Being apart of the main Parter At a Glance page, this panel was to be utilized by sales reps to keep track of any support tickets that their clients had for their information backup devices. So my job was to convey all the necessary information in a convenient way that didn't slow down the sales rep or make them go out of their way to find certain pieces of information.


The initial setup of the ticket panel before I began work on it consisted of only two parts, the ticket number, and the name of the ticket. The ticket number was a clickable link that allowed the sales rep to go to a completely different page to view all the information about that specific ticket. Because I wanted the sales reps to be able to quickly view any important imformation needed at a glance, and without having to nagivate to a different page, I interviewed many of the sales reps to gain insight on what information they thought was necessary to see at a glance. I found that most of the reps I interviewed wanted much more information on that panel than they were given. For example, they wanted the SN and name of that particular device listed in that panel because reps often had most, if not all, of their clients devices memorized. This would also allow them to quickly look up that device to see what was going on.


Another key piece of information most of the sales reps requested was knowledge of who and when last updated that ticket. Either the Datto employees would update it, or the client. Often times, it would be frusterating because there was no way to easily know which side was the last to update that ticket, so both parties would wait longer than necessary. However, with this bit of information added into the panel, sales reps can now easily see if the client was waiting on Datto to check up on the ticket and respond.




From the suggestion of one of the sales reps, I also added thresholds to that last update message. If Datto did not respond to the ticket within one day of the client responding to it, the sales rep would be notified by the 'more' button seen below turning red. This would prompt that rep to dig in further to see what the problem was. If the client did not respond to the ticket within 3 days, the sales rep would also be alerted with red, and hopefully this will help that rep to contact the client and find out whats going on.


Ive also added an alert for when the ticket is at least 10 days old, and an option to flag that ticket (which will only be shown for the rep that flagged it). Flagging a ticket will float it to the top of the list, making it easier to keep track of. Below is the final interation of the panel.






Datto - Open Opportunities Panel


Furthermore, I also worked on redesigning the Open Opportunities panel. This panel shows information about possible future business opportunities with that client, and how much that opportunity would be worth, based on previous interaction with the client.


With the user research conducting about this panel, I was able to quickly identify what key information was needed. The older version of this panel only consisted of the name of that opportunity and the the dollar amount of how much it was worth. I kept that information, as well as adding some of the things the sales reps suggested. You can see the added pieces below.






Datto - Sales Stats Panel


The sales stats panel displays all the sales information for the specified client. Nothing was specifically wrong with the information listed within it, but the arrangement of the information did need to be readjusted. Here is an image of what the sales stats panel looked like before, as well as the redesigned version, with some experimentation of different graphs displaying the number of devices that were sold to the client.






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